Donald’s 12 Days of Christmas

On the first day of Christmas, the Donald gave to me, a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the second day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, two MAGA hats
And a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the third day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, three swing states,
Two MAGA hats, and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the fourth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me,
Four interviews, three swing states, two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the fifth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, five Chinese ties,
Four interviews, three swing states, two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the sixth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, six Fox News anchors,
Five Chinese ties, four interviews, three swing states, two MAGA hats
And a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the seventh day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, seven golden airplanes,
Six Fox News anchors, five Chinese ties, four interviews, three swing states,
Two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the eighth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, eight Russians hacking,
Seven golden airplanes, six Fox News anchors, five Chinese ties, four interviews,
Three swing states, two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the ninth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, nine Clinton emails,
Eight Russians hacking, seven golden airplanes, six Fox News anchors, five Chinese ties,
Four interviews, three swing states, two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the tenth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, ten Ivanka snapchats,
Nine Clinton emails, eight Russians hacking, seven golden airplanes, six Fox News anchors,
Five Chinese ties, four interviews, three swing states, two MAGA hats
And a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the eleventh day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, eleven golden toupees,
Ten Ivanka snapchats nine Clinton emails, eight Russians hacking, seven golden airplanes,
Six Fox News anchors, five Chinese ties, four interviews, three swing states,
Two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

On the twelfth day of Christmas the Donald gave to me, twelve Cabinet posts,
Eleven golden toupees, ten Ivanka snapchats nine Clinton emails, eight Russians hacking,
Seven golden airplanes, six Fox News anchors, five Chinese ties, four interviews,
Three swing states, two MAGA hats and a lie in a three a.m. tweet.

Donald’s Feckless Flock.

The confirmation this last week that the Russian government used an invisible hand to sway our elections presented a remarkable choice for Republican leaders, one that separated true patriots from political shills.

On one hand there are the true hacks like Kellyanne Conway who called the CIA report “laughable” because her personal short term gain is greater than the national interest.

There are patriots like John McCain and Lindsey Graham who put out a statement with Chuck Schumer calling for a full congressional investigation of who, what, when, why, and how the Russians meddled this past fall.  They recognize the terrifying precedent that it sets if the United States of America is willing to stand idly by and discount our own intelligence agencies while another government plays puppet master with out elecorate.

Then there is a third group: the cowards. This breed of Republican sides with neither the CIA nor Russia (hrmm, who to choose…) but instead choose to distract, distort, and deny.

The epitome of this true profile in courage is none other than Speaker of the House Paul Ryan. He is a political novice, a moral lightweight, and a kitten in the age of lions.

Ryan would rather accept the short term benefit of power than acknowledge the awesome implications that another soverign power had its thumb on the scales of our electoral process.

Russia, the country we had a decades long Cold War against; the country who Aldrich Ames, Robert Hanssen, and others were caught spying for; the country we fought proxy wars against in Afghanistan and now Syria.  That Russia just waged an active campaign to delegitimize the central institution of our representative democracy and some Republicans would rather stay silent to appease a man who doesn’t recognize that coating everything in gold is tacky than stand up for our Constitution.

In response to the Washington Post story detailing the Intelligence Community’s assessment of Russia’s actions, President-Elect Trump attacked not Russia, but the CIA. As Saturday Night Live so perfectly satirized (is it satire if it’s true?) the president-elect is more willing to give the benefit of the doubt to Vladimir Putin than our own intelligence officers.

In the face of that, Speaker Ryan–who also receives intelligence briefings–refused to call for an investigation and instead said that the issue “shouldn’t become polarized.” Good thing we have a brave and principled speaker who is willing to stand up to those pesky… Democrats.

What Ryan should not only know, but be saying out loud, is that American intelligence services do not serve a political party. The are unequivocally non-partisan and work solely in the interests of the United States of America. The CIA has an estimated workforce of over 20,000 people, of whom only a small handful are politically appointed. They do not tailor assessments to fit a agenda or confirm a narrative.  Their job is collect facts, analyze, asses, and report. Nothing more, nothing less.

That Trump would not only ignore their conclusion, but say that they are failure of an organization is devastating to their mission.

We all know that Trump does not live in a world based in reality. He lies the way most people breath. In response to this lying we’ve watched “leaders” like Ryan regress into a creature with his tail permanently tucked between his legs.

For example last week when Ryan was asked by Scott Pelley about Trump’s claim that “millions voted illegally” for Hillary Clinton, he simply said he “wasn’t focused on those things” and “didn’t have a way to know” if what Trump said was true. Ryan chose to continue to cast doubt on the solvency our democracy rather than say “Yeah, that was a ludicrous tweet.”

Where does this end?

People often ‘joked’ during the campaign that Trump represented a threat to our democracy – a claim more accurately described as hyperbole than legitimate during the campaign. But now, as Trump has dabbled in conspiracy theories about illegal voting and decided to side with the Kremlin over Langley, it doesn’t feel so hyperbolic.

In the weeks since the election we’ve seen Trump start by calling the President of Taiwan, then criticize China for stealing a drone, and then again criticize China for giving it back. He has remained silent as North Carolina Republicans stripped an incoming Democratic administration of power. He used his bully pulpit to temporarily crush the stock prices of companies who have rubbed him the wrong way.  

Any one of things would be a presidential scandal and Trump is still weeks away from the oath.

Now more than ever we need leaders who have spines made of lead and are able to separate the politically expedient from the democratically disastrous. Every leader will have their sheep and if he continues to silently go along, Paul Ryan is going to be first of many to be sheared.

Follow on Twitter @EighteenthandU

Picture credit: CNN

Why I am forever hopeful.

Last spring, at age 25, I boarded my first plane destined for overseas. With the exception of a couple trips to America’s hat up north, I had never left the country.  My parents believed that I needed to see my own country, and all the natural awesomeness it had to offer, because I went abroad to marvel at man-made castles and paintings.  

So in high school, we packed up the family van and spent 6 weeks over the course of two summers staying in motels, eating roadside PB&J’s and stopping at every national park and baseball park along the way.  I’ve spent hours watching prairie dogs pop up from underground mazes, stained my shirt with BBQ in Memphis after walking through the hotel room where Martin Luther King Jr spent his final hours.  I’ve seen the glory of a sunrise in Yellowstone and the despair of gutted apartments and desolate shopping centers that lined the freeway for miles leaving New Orleans, years after Katrina.

I’ve seen the greatness every corner of this country can offer. I’ve seen hope in a small town waitresses in Fargo who told us about her night classes and the ambition in a hotel manager who works at night to avoid the oppressive heat in Phoenix while making ends meet. I’ve seen the kindness in a mechanic who helped us with a flat tire somewhere between El Paso and nowhere and the humor in bikers in West Virginia who showed my brother that men in with beards and leather jackets aren’t automatically scary.

I also have seen where the worst of our country still survives.  I remember feeling confused and befuddled in neighborhoods littered with Confederate flags only miles from Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas, home of the famous “Little Rock 9.” I remember asking and learning about these communities that were still clinging to a depressed vision of America, left behind by the spread of compassion and tolerance.

And for a long time these communities were just that, relegated to displaying Stars and Bars bumper stickers and putting “Don’t tread on me” signs in the rear window of their Silverados.  Republicans by default, they were forced to vote for Presidential candidates who ran on platforms of “compassionate conservatism” and paid little heed to the the true nationalist wishes of these communities.

And then 2016 descended down an escalator.

Donald Trump gave these people a voice they didn’t have before. He made it okay for Americans to group themselves by caste and align against those who they didn’t share in Bud Lights at the dive bar on Monday night. And worst of all, he allowed a small minority of this country to feel empowered to spread their antiquated way of life.

But I remain forever hopeful.  This vision won’t – and can’t – succeed.  There is too much good in this country, too much pride in our schools, our service members, our states, and our baseball teams.

Trump is a singular figure and without the bully pulpit of a fawning, ratings starved national media the incessant lying and hatred that has permeated our national dialogue will quiet. And without a singular ideology to defend, his echo chamber minions like Rudy Giuliani will no longer be given an outlet to lob grenades into civil discussion.

But it’s more than vanquishing the vitriol that Trump brought with him.  It’s about the remembering what has made America great already.  

Wealth is no longer a barrier to healthcare. Gender is no longer an obstacle to the legal definition of love.  Families will soon be united by by love, rather than divided by borders.  Ambitious students will no longer be burdened by loans, but boosted by learning.  Women and minorities can look at pictorials of our presidents and envision themselves seated in front of the flag.   

Standing in Philadelphia last night, President Obama stated that he still believed in hope because “in my visits to schools and factories, war theaters, national parks, in the letters written to me, in the tears you’ve shed over a lost loved one, I have seen again and again your goodness, and your strength, and your heart.”

I have my whole life to see the Coliseum. It has been there for 2000 years and I assume it’ll be there for 20 more. But in 2016, as our national fabric has been stress-tested repeatedly, I’m glad that I can share in Hillary and President Obama’s experience in having seen the goodness in every corner of our country. From Acadia to the Grand Canyon, there is not a country on earth that can match the awesomeness of the United State of America.

Choose hope.

Follow on Twitter @EighteenthandU

7 Days in November.

So here we are. One more week. Seven more merciful days until we can put this freakshow election behind us. With conflicting polls and the FBI leaking like a $20 yacht in a hurricane, the only sure bet at this point is that there will be a library’s worth of books written on how in the hell Donald Trump managed to almost (knocking on everything wooden in sight) become president.

I’m a political junkie, but his race has just about done it for me.  Every day I see a headline that makes me furrow my brow and shake my head.  I wouldn’t ever fall for the clickbait if it weren’t for the need to stay informed and literate in political discussions at work.

Ever since CNN poured $50 million into political coverage a year ago, facts and rationale have taken a back seat to ratings and drama. But it goes beyond “reality news” stations like CNN and Fox. Just the other day The Hill ran a headline that said “Ex-FBI official calls the Clintons a crime family.”  I mean good God, The Hill is supposed to be a sane policy rag and even they have succumbed to reporting comments that shouldn’t be repeated outside of the parlor.

When people say that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have run the nastiest election in modern memory, they’re wrong.  Donald Trump has run the nastiest election in history.

Trump normalized “loser” as a political adjective. Trump made it so that we’re no longer shocked by headlines that say “A 5th accuser comes forward.”  Trump created a toxic environment where in the land of the free he calls for his opponent to be jailed and openly uses the word “criminal” to describe her.  Remember, this is a contest where the loser goes back to their house, not to the gallows.

Here we are, America, and a week before the election and you have liberals wearing shirts that say “Nasty Woman” and conservatives changing their Twitter handles to “Deplorable Dan.”  The thing is, I think Clinton is right that a good handful of Trump supporters are deplorable people, but the fact that it is a phrase used by a candidate for president about another candidate’s supporters demonstrates what a sad state of affairs this is.

We are all flying the same flag, right?

Remember when everyone freaked out in 2012 because Romney called half of Obama supporters poor?  Is it wrong that I yearn for a time when closed door, off-the-cuff comments about voting patterns based on economic status was the worst gaffe a politician could make?

Trump created this new environment. Opinions used to have to be vetted before they made it to a national audience. Uncouth comments used to get a candidate banished. Now they’re paraded across the screen in promos for The Situation Room.

No matter how many fact-checking chryons CNN employs while they air Trump’s comments, the damage is done just by sharing them.  People see “Clinton is a criminal” in quotes next to a CNN logo and boom, now they’re telling their neighbors that Clinton should be in jail. Sounds too simple? Talk to some of the people in Kansas, Florida, and New York that I have over the past year.

Yes, the media has an obligation to report the day’s events, so of course there is the argument that even if Trump says something crazy, they need to air it.  That is wrong.

If Trump says “my opponent is a criminal who should be jailed” then airing that quote is making that sound like it could be true.  A recent poll showed that 40% of Georgia Republicans think Hillary and Bill were legitimately involved in murders to hide criminal activity.  Trust me, Washington is way more VEEP than House of Cards.

But alas, I digress.  After the dust settles on this mess we can discuss the media’s culpability in this disaster until pigs fly.  We probably won’t even be done by then.

What I really want to understand here, is were these nationalist feelings and hate always present in America and we just never knew it?  How can a process usually dominated by lifelong public servants debating issues devolve into a grade school food fight with one candidate shouting “no you’re the puppet!” over the other during a debate in front of 70 million people.  If I did that in front of 10 people I’d be mortified, much less 20% of the entire country.

How can 40% of my fellow Americans be duped–willingly or blindly–into supporting the single worst candidate for president, ever.

Never have so many conservative papers endorsed a Democrat. Never have so many papers made their first ever endorsement. And never have so many papers dis-endorsed a candidate before.  This isn’t because Hillary is the Messiah, but because Trump is a fear mongering moron with no respect for anything but himself.

This election and its tired coverage has reduced our nation to two even more divided camps than we were before. But, it’s no longer about Democrat vs Republican but rather sane folk vs Trump supporters. How can someone vote for the sober, Mormon Romney and the war hero McCain and then suddenly side with Donald “grab ‘em by the pussy” Trump?  Have our national morals been corrupted that badly?

Back in January before the Iowa caucuses I wrote in my original blog for this site that Trump was running a campaign of fear and had galvanized those who feared “the other.”  I wrote how this was a powerful, terrifying message, but that in the long run, hope always dominated over fear and despair.

With 7 days remaining, and polls that require me to put new sheets on my bed each morning, I can only pray that I’m right.

Follow on Twitter @EighteenthandU

Photo credit: HILL STREET STUDIOS VIA GETTY IMAGES

The Best Jokes You Didn’t Hear At The Al Smith Dinner

The Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner is an annual white-tie affair held in New York City to raise money for Catholic Charities. It features the who’s who of the New York elite and since John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon first spoke at the dinner in 1960, it has been a light-hearted rite of passage for presidential candidates heading into the homestretch every four years.

Usually candidates take a self-deprecating approach to their speeches and the roast is more Kiwanis Club than it is Comedy Central. This year, however, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump took quite a few liberties with that theme and traded barbs loosely cloaked in often poor humor. Trump’s performance even elicited boos from the crowd, which was probably a first for the dinner.

Here are the best jokes that you didn’t hear, but perhaps should have.

Trump:

  • “Most of you had to pay to be here tonight. But as a guest of honor my invite was free.  This is good, because I didn’t want to break my streak of not giving money to charities.”
  • “If you can’t hear me in the back, it is because they borrowed this microphone from the first presidential debate.”
  • “My running mate, Mike Pence, wasn’t able to make it. He declined the invitation, saying he would need at least two full days preparing for the Sunday shows to explain what I really meant in this speech.”
  • “You may not know this about me, but the only thing that stopped me from becoming a Cardinal was those hats. I mean, what a sin it would have been to have this covered up my whole life.”
  • “I’ll admit, I was a little confused when the waiter earlier asked if I wanted fish or chicken.  I told him it’s actually pronounced ‘Long John Silvers’ and ‘Popeyes.'”
  • “I was a little nervous when I heard the dress code for tonight was ‘white tie.’  Jake Tapper, if you’re listening, ‘I disavow.'”

Clinton:

  • “You may notice Bill isn’t here with me tonight.  If he were he would’ve sat right there next to me and Donald, but I decided I could wait 3 more months to hear Donald say “Hi, President Clinton.”

    Mic drop. HRC out.

Follow on Twitter @EighteenthandU

Photo Credit: JONATHAN ERNST / REUTERS

Washington Ain’t Local to Nowhere.

A wise man once said “All Tweets leave from D.C.” Or maybe it was “All roads lead to Rome?” Something like that, anyway.  

In an age where rural America is revolting against the established order, the campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Senate hopefuls everywhere have continued to craft their messages in glass walled conference rooms in the shadow of the Capitol while the pulse of the people beats in diners and dive bars in towns you’ve never heard of.

Washington D.C. is not like the rest of the country. Like many other major cities, it exists on an island of blue among a sea of red.  But in addition to being relatively liberal, it is also an intellectual capital for members of both parties.

All of the law firms, consulting firms, policy shops, political agencies that occupy the thirteen story buildings across Washington require college degrees and enough internships to ensure you’re broke as a mere conversation starter, so rarely will you find yourself on the Metro next to someone still knocking manure off his Stars and Bars emblazoned boots.

It is why Marco Rubio and John Kasich each took ~35% of the vote to Donald Trump’s 13% in D.C.’s primary.  They were the establishment choices, seen as smart, sensible, and capable of being president. But, it also is emblematic of how far removed D.C. is from the rest of the country considering Rubio and Kasich each only won one other state.

Former Speaker Tip O’Neill is famous for saying that “all politics is local.”  Yet, many national campaigns feature talking points fashioned in broad strokes discussing general platitudes that have been focused grouped by a $500 an hour paid consultant.  Obama is often critiqued as being out of touch because during visits to the Rust Belt he still touts the return of the auto industry and 75 consecutive months of job growth, but fails to realize that none of those metrics matter much when the fridge at home is still empty.

In March, I traveled to Topeka, Kansas, for the Democratic Caucus.  There, I grabbed a clipboard and walked through neighborhoods and apartment complexes, knocking on doors to gauge interest in the political process. The conversations I had there would have never occurred on Connecticut Avenue.

One young man, dressed in an American flag t-shirt and blue jeans, went from polite to vitriolic at the mere mention of Hillary Clinton. “Man, f*ck that bitch. She belongs in jail! Can I vote for handcuffs?” he exclaimed, quickly slamming the door in my face. Keep in mind, this is months before Trump would first declare “lock her up” as a policy position.

Then last week in Bradenton, Florida, a women spent a considerable amount of time expressing dismay at everything Donald Trump has ever done.  When it was implied that meant she would be voting for Clinton she stopped and said “Oh no, I could never do that. She has had people killed and paid off the media to cover it up.”

What.

These anecdotes are exactly why every time a crowd on a D.C. rooftop has predicted a Trump demise he has instead proven resilient. Trump isn’t speaking to avid readers of Roll Call, he is speaking to the person who glances at CNN as he flips between Duck Dynasty and the Steelers game.

Running national campaigns from Washington is how Republicans failed to stop Trump in the first place.  Rubio, Kasich, Cruz, and Bush all ran campaigns with a D.C. mindset. “Focus on policy, decorum, and talking points and everything will turn out okay, right?” Wrong.

Time and time again, polling from red states showed that traditional branding wasn’t working and yet the political class refused to believe it. Conservative lifers like George Will, along with every veteran of the Bush Administration predicted the end of Trump every single time he said something outrageous, not realizing that rebellion was exactly what made him stronger.

Politics may affect everyone, but it isn’t for everyone.  If you’re reading this, you’re probably into politics and will do your homework if you read a headline that says “Hillary Is A Serial Killer.” But there are plenty of people who were raised conservative in parts of the country where they may never travel to D.C. to see the Capitol in person. The prevailing opinion in those communities is that D.C. residents are bringing drugs, bringing crime, they’re rapists crooks and liars and gosh-darnit, Hillary very well may be a serial killer.

This is not to say that future campaigns should stoop down to the lowest denominator, but there does need to be a counterbalance to running a campaign targeted at people who understand how the sausage is made versus people who vote with their gut.

This is what Obama understood and why he was so successful. In 2008, he ran on “hope” which is in no way a policy position. Looking back on his candidacy it is this message that stands out, not his policy positions.  Sure, he mentioned how people need healthcare, but during the campaign that was about the idea of healthcare, not the nuts and bolts of how it gets passed.  Even now Clinton’s campaign keeps saying she has “detailed policy proposals” on her website. People are as likely to click on those as they are to get into a windowless, rusted, Chevy van with a cardboard sign saying “free massages” taped to the door.

Most Americans probably couldn’t come within 50% correctness of detailing the process of how a bill becomes a law and would stare blankly if you told them that most bills that pass the Senate start moving with the “Rule 14 process.”  Detailing a policy is good if you’re pitching yourself to an editorial board or to a union leadership. But when speaking to the average 2016 voter, all they want to know is how their life is going to get better.

This is why Trump still maintains his 40% floor despite being a horrifying mashup of Richard Nixon and Anthony Weiner. Like a talking doll with a pull string, he just continually repeats that he alone can fix anything and everything. Trade? He can fix it. ISIS? Dead. Common Core? Wharton. Nickleback? Banished.

Even though he’s more full of shit than trash can in a dog park, he knows his story and he’s sticking to it.  At some basic level he understands the “all politics is local” mantra and tells people what they want to hear in every situation. He may never be able to deliver, but in the short term it works.

It is still too early to tell if the nationalist pillars of Trumpism will survive this election to permanently soil our politics, but the disgust with insider baseball is likely here to stay (especially during a Clinton presidency).  As such, campaign gurus would be wise to start crafting their message on cocktail napkins in bars in Roanoke, Lawrence, and Evansville instead of on whiteboards in Chicago, Washington, and Boston.

Follow on Twitter @EighteenthandU

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Dear Donald, The Deplorables Are All Yours.

Remember when Donald Trump tried to make the argument that Hillary Clinton’s “deplorables” comment was as bad as Mitt Romney’s infamous “47%” remark?  As if he need more statements that could be rated with Pinocchios.

In 2012, Romney was running closely behind President Obama despite being viciously attacked and successfully cast as a callous, white collar corporate raider with little regard for the average worker.  So, when audio surfaced of him talking to high dollar donors about how he shouldn’t even bother talking to people too poor to pay taxes, it looked really bad. Like really bad.

In the end, Romney’s poll numbers never quite recovered from the ensuing onslaught as it not only solidified the “47%” as a voting bloc for Obama, but also drew away some independents who felt alienated by a candidate who didn’t appear to have “empathy” as a character trait.

Campaigns are defined by moments, and that was Romney’s.  Last month, Republican’s thought Hillary Clinton had hers when she was caught on a private video saying that “half of Donald Trump’s supporters fit into a basket of deplorables.”

Republican’s pounced, saying that Clinton had written off half the electorate and was insulting half of America.  And at the second Republican debate, Trump mentioned this again.

Well, she wasn’t doing any of that.  And after the video of Trump making sexually aggressive remarks to an Access Hollywood host emerged this week, it turns out she was right.

The point Clinton was making was that Trump has inspired a portion of this country to become politically active in a way that they weren’t before.  Sure, these people may have voted before and probably voted for Republicans.  But before they were voting for Republicans due to their traditionally conservative principles.  This time around, those principles have been drowned out by the cacophony of dog whistles emanating from Donald Trump’s twitter account.

Clinton was acknowledging a truth about Trump supporters that I have yet to have been able to wrap my head around.  The “half” she was referring to are people that hold values that have been (rightly) left behind as the country has progressed.  These people maintain feelings of white supremacy, nationalism, and sexism, and they have never had a candidate to vote for for those reasons… until now.

This is what should bother the other “half.”  Even if they are supporting Trump because they are Republicans and want a Republican in the White House, they are aligning themselves with someone who plays to the worst demons in this country.

You are the company you keep and it should – yet somehow doesn’t – bother the regular Republicans who are voting for someone who the KKK describes as a dream candidate.

The tape from Access Hollywood where Trump declares that he can force himself on whomever he wants to, ought to be a bright red line in the sand for any Trump supporter who considers themselves a decent person.  There are some out there who will see this comment and agree that it was merely “locker room talk” and still back Trump. Those people are deplorable, and if you find the comments troubling but still support him, then you’re right there in that basket with them.

By the transitive property (for those of you who are rusty since 8th grade that is if A=B, and B=C, then A=C) if you support Trump, who is supported unanimously by white supremacists and sexists, then aren’t you worried that makes you one of them?

Trump has rallied the worst demons throughout America and has built his toothpick tower of support on their backs.  The good people who support Trump are unwittingly lending their names to those believe in deplorable values. When David Duke says that his guy gets 40% of the vote, he’s including the “good” people in that number, too.  If that were me, I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night.

Clinton’s remark was acknowledging an uncomfortable truth about the sad state of this election, that while awkward and uncomfortable, is true and the public knows it. The 47% will be a reliable and solid voting block for years to come, but hopefully the deplorables go the way of the dodo.